MOLDING THE FLOW OF LIGHT



J. D. JOANNOPOULOS

Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA



ABSTRACT


       In the past few years an exciting new class of materials has emerged that provides capabilities along a new dimension for the control and manipulation of light. These materials, known as "photonic crystals," are viewed ideally as a composite of a periodic array of macroscopic dielectric scatterers in a homogeneous dielectric matrix [1]. A photonic crystal affects the properties of a photon mode in much the same way that a semiconductor affects the properties of an electron. Consequently, photons in photonic crystals experience a photonic band gap and can therefore be localized at point-, line- and planar-defects [2,3]. This new ability to mold and guide light leads naturally to many novel applications of these materials in a wide range of technologies. An introductory survey of the field including recent exciting developments is presented.

 

REFERENCES

[1] Photonic Crystals, J. D. Joannopoulos, R. D. Meade and J. Winn, Princeton University Press, 1995.
[2] Photonic Crystals: The Road from Theory to Practice, S.G. Johnson and J.D. Joannopoulos, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001
[3] J. Joannopoulos, P. Villeneuve, and S. Fan, "Photonic Crystals: Putting a New Twist on Light," Nature 386, 143 (1997).